Showing posts with label purpose. Show all posts
Showing posts with label purpose. Show all posts

9/21/2013

tsuchi Daruma

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tsuchi Daruma 土達磨 "Daruma from Earth"


. Introducing Clay Dolls 土人形 tsuchi ningyoo


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蚯蚓鳴くや土の達磨はもとの土
mimizu naku ya tsuchi no daruma wa moto no tsuchi

a mole cricket's song -
a Daruma from earth
goes back to earth

Tr. Gabi Greve

. Masaoka Shiki 正岡子規 .




Tsuchidaruma o kobotsuji 土達磨を毀つ辞
正岡子規 Masaoka Shiki


. WKD : mimizu naku 蚯蚓鳴 mole-cricket singing .


汝もといづくの辺土の山の土くれぞ。
急須(きゅうす)となりて茶人が長き夜のつれづれを慰むるにもあらねば、徳利となりて林間に紅葉を焚(た)くの風流も知らず。さりとて来山が腹に乗りて物喰はぬ妻と可愛がられたる女人形のたぐひにもあらず。過去の因業(いんごう)いまだ尽きず、拙(つたな)きすゑものつくりにこねられてかかる見にくき姿とはなりける。むつかしき頬(ほお)ふくらしてひたすらに世を睨(にら)みつけたる愛嬌(あいきょう)なさに前の持主にも見離され道端の夜店に埃(ほこり)をかぶりて手のなき古雛(ふるびな)と共に淋(さび)しく立ち尽したるを八銭に代へて連れ帰り、新世帯の床の間に行脚(あんぎゃ)の蓑笠(みのかさ)に添へて安置したるは汝が一世の曠(こう)なるべし。

然りしより後汝と一室を共にして相対することここに七年、朝にながめ、夕にながめ、書に倦(う)みたる春の日、文作りなづみし秋の夜半、ながめながめてつくづくと愛想尽きたる今、忽ち破(や)れ団扇(うちわ)と共に汝を捨てんの心切(せつ)なり。世に用あるものは形の美醜を問はず、とぢ蓋(ぶた)もわれ鍋に用ゐられ悪女も終には縁づく時あり。汝無用の長物にしてしかも人に憎まれくらさんはなかなかに罪深きわざなめるを、我固(もと)より汝に恨(うらみ)なし、今汝を捨つるとも汝かまへて我を恨むべからず。捨てんか捨てんか、捨てたりともしろかねの猫にあらねば門前の童子もよも拾はじ。売らんか売らんか、売りたりとも金箔(きんぱく)の兀(は)げたる羽子板にも劣りていたづらに屑屋(くずや)に踏(ふ)み倒されん。如(し)かず椽先の飛石に投げうつて昔に返る粉(こ)な微塵(みじん)、宿業全く終りて永く三界(さんがい)の輪廻(りんね)を免れんには。
汝もし霊あらば庭下駄の片足を穿(うが)ちて疾(と)く西に帰れ。

蚯蚓鳴くや土の達磨はもとの土

〔『ホトトギス』第二巻第一号 明治31・10・10〕

source : www.aozora.gr.jp


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Tsuchidaruma (つちだるま, lit. Earth Ball)
- Dirt Ball

is a shoot hissatsu technique.



source : inazuma-eleven.wikia.com


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. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .



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2/26/2013

Tatami heri borders

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Tatami heri 畳の縁 borders

Details about the
. Tatami floor mats 畳 .  

The heri 縁 border, edges of a tatami mat are made of various materials, with various patterns.

Lately, the use of tatami has become less and less and the heri brocade weavers have found new objects for their products.







- source : vivajieigy.exblog.jp




Pattern for a kozeni ire 小銭入れ purse for coins






small purse




. gamakuchi, gamaguchi がま口 Daruma purse .



saifu 財布 purse
. . . CLICK here for Photos !

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pen case with Daruma ペンケース・だるま



source : nagasakitatami


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- Reference -

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. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .

. - - - Welcome to Edo 江戸 ! - - -


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8/02/2012

Musubi Daruma Shibarare Jizo

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Musubi Daruma and Shibarare Jizo 結びだるま
Daruma and Jizo bound by a rope









This is a special Daruma with a rope around the body.
You buy it when you make a comittmend (for example give up smoking or drinking sake) and to BIND you to your promise, the Daruma gets a rope to remind you.
You can buy such a Daruma for a New Year resolution on the Year End Market on December 31 to January 2 at the tempel Nanzoo-In, Tokyo.
- source : 結びだるま

This Daruma custom is closely related to the Jizo statue below.

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Shibarare Jizoo 縛られ地蔵 Jizo bound by ropes


at temple Nanzo-In 南蔵院
東京都葛飾区東水元2-28-25



Daruma bound by a rope



And Jizo on a votive tablet (ema 絵馬)

source : I.HATADA. 1997

Daruma to tie with a rope are sold at the New Year Fair from December 31 to January, 2.
Then a special Daruma ritual (Daruma kuyoo だるま供養) is held.

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quote
Nanzoin Temple visitors make a wish and a knot

Nanzoin Temple in Katsushika, Tokyo, is famous for the Shibarare Jizo, a rope-tied guardian deity.
The legend of Shibarare Jizo goes back to the early 18th century. On a hot summer afternoon, a kimono store clerk pulling a cart laden with kimono cloth passed a Jizo statue, then stopped to rest in the shade of a tree by the Jizo statue and dozed off. When he woke up, his bundle of goods was gone.

In a panic, he rushed to the magistrate’s office. Then-renowned magistrate Ooka Echizen 越前守 carried out an investigation.

As no witnesses could be found, the judge decided exceptional measures would be needed to solve the case. After pondering the matter, he decided that the statue of Jizo, a god that protects travelers, had been derelict in its duty. Echizen instructed his constables to return to the crime scene and arrest the Jizo statue.

The men lifted it from its heavy stone pedestal and bound it with ropes.

“Jizo,” the magistrate said, “is guilty for his negligence in keeping watch and letting the robber escape.”




Word of the trial spread, and a crowd of spectators thronged to the magistrate’s office yard. Then the magistrate tactically ordered the gate closed, and said, “breaking into the divine court is unforgivable.” As punishment, the magistrate fined each spectator a roll of cloth.

They went home, and brought some cloth to the magistrate. Among the pieces brought by them, Echizen found one belonging to the clerk, which lead to the arrest of a notorious ring of thieves.

Today, people believe the Jizo of Nanzoin temple grants all wishes — including protection from robbery, better health, matchmaking (tie a knot), protecting you against evil, and more. When you make a wish, you bind the Jizo with a rope. After your wish comes true, you untie the rope.
All the ropes tied and untied are made into a bonfire at 11 p.m. on New Year’s Eve.

source : www.stripes.com - Hiroshi Chida


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- quote -
Shibarare Jizō 縛られ地蔵, String-Bound Jizō
This form of Jizō is relatively new. The earliest Japanese text to mention Shibarare Jizō (to my knowledge) is the Edo Sunago 江戸砂子, dated 1732, which cites the curious habit of binding a Jizō statue at Rinsenji Temple 林泉寺 (Tokyo) in ropes before beseeching the deity for divine intervention. There are various legends about this form of Jizō. Three are presented below. Although String-Bound Jizō is clearly an Edo-era creation, the deity's origins may have drawn from a much earlier story appearing in the Taiheiki 太平記 (circa 1371 Japanese text), which describes a soldier taking refuge in a Jizō sanctuary after fleeing from a battle. As the enemy drew nearer, Jizō appeared in the form of a priest who was then captured by the enemy in place of the soldier. From that point forward, the Jizō statue in the sanctuary showed markings where it had been bound.

Legend One.
Rinsenji Temple (Tokyo). Text and photo from Yomiuri Shimbun, Sept. 9, 2003.
Legend Two.
Nanzō-in Temple (Tokyo).
Legend Three.
Paper-Pasted Jizō (Kamihari Jizō 紙張地蔵).

- source : Mark Schumacher


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quote
Shibarare Jizō 縛られ地蔵, String-Bound Jizō
The gentle, round face of Jizō, the guardian deity of children, can barely be seen amidst the layers of cord tied around the stone statue of the god at Rinsenji Temple in Bunkyo Ward, Tokyo, which was erected in 1602. The stone statue called "Shibarare (string-bound) Jizō" is said to have been donated to the temple by its founder, Ito Hanbei, in memory of his late parents.

There are other Shibarare Jizō statues in other locations around Tokyo.
However, the statue at Rinsenji appeared in "Zenigata Heiji," a detective story set in the Edo Era (1603-1868), written by novelist Kodo Nomura (1882-1963).

Local residents originally started tying strings around the statue when offering prayers for the recovery of stolen or missing items. When their prayers were answered, people were supposed to remove the string. These days, however, many people visit the temple to offer prayers for various other reasons. "At the end of every year, we hold a ceremony to remove all the strings and burn them.
But the statue was already covered with new strings in January," said the chief priest at the temple, Shin-jin Eda, 40.

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Paper-Pasted Jizō (kamihari Jizō
紙張地蔵)
Located at the Yōshū-in 陽秀院 (Nagoya), the statue is covered with paper prayer slips. Devotees write their prayers on the slips and then paste the slips on Jizō's body.
- source : Mark Schumacher -


kamihari Jizo


. Zenigata Heiji 銭形平次 .

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Taikooan 退耕庵 Taiko-An - Tamazusajijo 玉章地蔵
former Komachi Temple 小町寺.


This is another Jizo in a temple in Kyoto, plastered with the many love-letters that Ono no Komachi received and plastered on it.
It is now a hot-spot for lovers

Komachi Fumihari Jizo 小町文張地蔵尊

The statue is about 3 meters high.



source : www.ntv.co.jp/kyoto



. Ono no Komachi 小野 小町 .
c. 825 — c. 900. Waka Poetess and Famous Beauty


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. Jizoo Bosatsu (Kshitigarbha) 地蔵菩薩  




CLICK for more Musubi Daruma photos !

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shibari Kannon 縛り観音
多治見市大原町にある”大杉の観音様
Osugi Kannon, Tajimi Gifu





- shared by Aoi on facebook -

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4/09/2012

Hi no yoojin - fire prevention

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Hi no yoojin 火の用心 fire prevention



. Koshigaya Daruma 越谷市だるま .

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At temple Jindai-Ji 深大寺

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Himeji Fire Department 姫路西消防署

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hi no yoojin 火迺要慎 "beware of fire"

Amulet from Atago Shrine

Homusubi no mikoto 火産霊命 Deity of Fire


. Atago Jinja 愛宕神社 Kyoto  


. Musaigai 無災害お守り amulets against fire .


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Click for more kokeshi !

Kokeshi wooden doll 火の用心 こけし


. Kokeshi, Wooden Dolls こけし .


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Fukusuke shookadan 福助消火弾
fire extinguisher in the form of Fukusuke



. Fukusuke 福助だるま .


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source : blogs.yahoo.co.jp/warszawa

柿本人麻呂=人丸=火止まる
This is a play on the sound of the name of Kakinomoto Hitomaro

ki no moto - hi no moto - the source of a fire
hitomaro - hitomaru - fire is extinguishes



ほのぼのと明石の浦の朝霧に 
島隠れ行く舟をしぞ思ふ

Faintly with the dawn
That glimmers on Akashi Bay,
In the morning mist
A boat goes hidden by the isle -
And my thoughts go after it.

Tr. Edwin A. Cranston



. Kakinomoto no Hitomaro 柿本 人麻呂 .
Poet, c. 662 - 710. included in the Man'yōshū Poetry Collection

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Fires are a problem at any time. Some seasons are more prone to fires. In Japan, we have most fires in winter, when people use heating devices and the air is dry.

During the Edo period, when people lived closely in wooden homes and used open fire for cooking, fires were especially terrible.

on the lookout for fire, hi no ban 火の番
watching out for a fire, hi no yoojin 火の用心


hut for the night watch, banya 番屋
..... hi no ban koya 火の番小屋
night watch, yoban 夜番
..... yokei, yakei 夜警 (やけい)
making the night rounds, yomawari 夜回り



kantaku 寒柝(かんたく wooden clappers of the watchman
One or two would walk along the streets and make a loud noise with the wooden clappers, so the neighbourhood knew it was safe to sleep deeply for a while.

visiting someone after a fire damage, kaji mimai 火事見舞
..... usually with a gift of money


Katen 火天  the God of Fire

. WKD - Fire (kaji 火事) .


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Click for more "Hi no Yojin" goods.


Hibuse Daruma ... 火防達磨 Fire and war preventing Daruma.
Temple Junshin-Ji


. hi no yoojin 火の用心 watch out for fire - goods .


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2/27/2012

Megane glasses

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megane メガネ / 眼鏡  glasses, spectacles, Brille



だるまメガネ - ダルマメガネ




Source : pon megane


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getting older -
even the gods
need glasses


年を取る 神様さえかける 眼鏡かな


aelter werden -
selbst die Goetter
tragen Brille






. Stone Jizoo 石地蔵  

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行春や眼に合はぬめがね失ひぬ
yuku haru ya me ni awanu megane ushinainu

spring is leaving -
I lost the glasses
that didn't fit me




SPRING and
. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 in Edo .

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見えぬ眼の方の眼鏡の玉も拭く
mienu me no hoo no megane no tama mo fuku

I clean even the lens
of the spectacles for my eye
that does not see


In 1946, he caught pneumonia and pleurisy and spent most of the rest of his life in his sickbed. He eventually lost the use of both his right lung and his right eye.
. Hino Soojoo 日野草城 Hino Sojo .
(1901 - 1956)

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- quote
Spectacles in Japan
Their Early Manufacture and Their Major Influence on Frame Development

Adapted mostly from the numerous detailed research works of Sekiya Shirayama and Professor Saiichi Mishima
Some information also from “Vision Aids in History”


We know from a review of early Japanese literature that the term ‘eyeglasses’ was first noted around the year 1551. Francisco St. Xavier (1506-1552), a member of the Society of Jesus founded in Spain, visited Japan in 1549 as a missionary with the goal of converting people to Christianity. He was unable to meet the most powerful lords of Japan, the Emperor and the Shogun, because of a civil war. Instead he visited Yoshitaka Ohuchi, an influential local feudal lord. He was granted an audience and brought many gifts, including vision aids (eyeglasses). Therefore it is considered that vision aids first appeared in Japan at that time, possibly the ones presented by St. Xavier to Ohuchi. This story has several sources and is considered highly reliable as a historical fact. Other Jesuits who later followed Xavier also brought similar gifts in order to obtain permission to continue their missionary activities.

In addition to this, the Daisenin Temple (Kyoto) houses another old pair of nasal-hinged (pivoted - riveted) eyeglasses. According to Temple tradition, which is questionable because there are no supporting records, this pair was used by the eighth Shogun, Yoshimasa Ashikaga (1436-1490) and were then handed down to the twelfth Shogun, Yoshiharu Ashikaga (1511-1550). He subsequently gave these glasses to the founder of this Temple. It should not be discussed easily, but, in a calculation,Quite possibly these are the oldest vision aids in the world with known provenance (unless something earlier exists at the Vatican Museum). The eyeglasses and case are decorative, beautiful, and made of hand-carved white ivory. This type of spectacles was used towards the end of the 15th century in Europe, as noted in Poulet’s 1978 Atlas.

Two other early pair of spectacles are conserved in the Memorial Museum for Shogun Ieyasu Tokugawa (1542-1616), founder of the Tokugawa Shogunate. They are made of yellow tortoiseshell and have a rigid bridge. It is said, however, that nobody knows for certain how these eyeglasses arrived at the Museum. They are of a style used in Europe at the end of the 15th century. One story says that these glasses were brought in 1611 by Sebastian Viscaino to express the gratitude of the Viceroy of Mexico for the help that Ieyasu had extended to some shipwrecked Mexicans.

Katsumoto Onishi, M.D., Japanese scholar and pioneer of spectacles-research, studied the first type of spectacles in Japan. His observations were serially written in the Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology in 1919. Dr. Onishi earned great respect as a highly regarded leader of the Japanese Ophthalmological Society in the early 1900’s. At first he expressed that the first introduction of spectacles into Japan was 1529, but 4 years later, he corrected this date to 1551. Sekiya Shirayama has also confirmed the authentic material which shows the date to be 1551.

The literature regarding the early history of spectacle manufacturing in Japan has been explored and an important conclusion can now be drawn about the major role and influence that Japan played in the development of spectacles in the Far East. Spectacles are called megane in Japanese and this word apparently originated in the middle of the 17th century. Along with the earlier word aitai, these were both listed in the important encyclopedia published in 1712-13.



Nishikawa Joken ( 1648-1724) wrote the book "Nagasaka Yawa-gusa : Night stories of Nagasaki". He stated that Hamada Yahei, a merchant from Nagasaki, was the first to start manufacturing spectacles in Japan. Yahei was an active trader in the 1620s and he traveled to Taiwan to become involved with the struggle with the Dutch people. It is said that he taught Ikushima Tokichi, who actually made the spectacles, but the details of this are unknown. On the other hand, spectacles were also manufactured in Kyoto in the middle of the17th Century. Matsue Shigeyori (1602-1680) wrote "Kebukigua" in 1645 in which he listed gem-art as working with spectacles, Rosary stones, and pearls. There were many manufacturers in Kyoto, beginning from ancient times, and they made ornaments using amber, quartz, corals, and pearls. These were known as crystal works (Tama-Zaiku). With these traditional techniques, people started to polish glass for spectacles. The best lens was made of quartz, this glass had originated in China, and both sides of the lenses were polished. Glass production in Japan began around 1620 and as production increased, it slowly replaced natural quartz.

In the book "Kyo-Suzume" (spallows of Kyoto) written in 1665, there is a picture which shows spectacle shops. Also, in the book "Yoshu-Fushi" there is a description of how to lenses are polished. Subsequently, many books were published describing lead polishing. However, there was no book showing the frame, until 1732 when a book "Mankin-Sangyo-Bukuro (Collection of Miscellaneous Products) described the spectacle frames: the green frame by Ivory, hair of Wales (actually this was the hair-teeth of whales, cormorant bone, brass, etc). There is no doubt that spectacle frames were also made of brass before 1730.

On the other hand, in Europe, cheaper spectacles used wire frames while more expensive spectacles used metal frames made from materials such as brass. In England, it was understood that the monocle (the quizzing glass for myopic use) with a brass frame was popular. The production of brass had been known in China before Christ, and brass products were also imported into Japan and they have examples of such brass products preserved at Shosoin Treasure House. In both the Roman Empire and in China, coins were minted out of brass and therefore that material was in popular use in the 17th Century in Japan. In the latter half of the 17th Century, a book "Edo-Kanoko" (Miscellaneous Pictures of Edo) was published in 1687. In it there are separate descriptions of both the gem-artists and the glass polishers. In addition, "Yoshu-Fushi" published in 1684 describes Japanese eyeglasses as being superior to the imported ones. Therefore, it is probable that the Japanese spectacles of that time reached a high standard compared to those made in other countries.

During this 17th century, the Japanese excelled in string spectacles, added the midline nasal projection bridge, and reserved the largest spectacles for the nobility. Another new trade began to appear in the late 17th century, known as Japanning. This arrived in Paris, then London, and soon spread to Holland and Germany. This was a newly learned Varnishing (Lacquering) process from the Far East that was very much in demand. Optical cases made with Japanning were often considered works of art. The process was kept a virtual secret until the mid 18th century.

MORE
- source : www.antiquespectacles.com



hanamegane 鼻眼鏡 Glasses "on the nose"
temochigata megane 手持ち型眼鏡 Glasses "to hold in the hand"



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. Repairmen and Business in Edo 江戸の修理屋 .

megane uri, meganeuri 眼鏡売り selling glasses,
exchanging old ones for new ones

One of the first pair of glasses in Japan  in the possession of Tokugawa Ieyasu, now preserved at Kunozan  久能山東照宮.

The vendors and repairmen of glasses were quite a news in the beginning of Edo, later people got more used to them.
They carried their merchandise in a wooden box with glasses painted on them.



They called out for their merchandise in a high-pitched voice,
meganeeya megane めがねーーーや めがね

hence the following senryu:

呼び声に細く長くは眼鏡売り
yobikoe ni hosoku nagaku wa meganeuri

the vendor of spectacles
calles out in a thin
and long voice




source : runomi.at.webry.info

There were still many people who could not read or write in the beginning of the Edo period.

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toomegane, too megane 遠眼鏡 Tomegane, telescope


source and more photos : tamamizu-ya.co.jp
オランダ製遠眼鏡(江戸時代・長崎経由) from Holland, via Nagasaki


三文が霞見にけり遠眼鏡
san mon ga kasumi mi ni keri tômegane

for three pennies
nothing but mist...
telescope


Issa's tone is wryly ironic.
He (or someone) has paid three pennies (three mon) to peer through a telescope to see ... only mist. On one level, he groans at the waste of money to have paid to see, magnified, nothing--the same nothing that the naked eye views for free. On another level-- and there's always another level in Issa's best haiku-- he smiles at human enterprise and its futility.
According to Makoto Ueda, this haiku refers to a scenic lookout on Yushima Hill in Edo (today's Tokyo); Dew on the Grass: The Life and Poetry of Kobayashi Issa(Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2004) 16.
The mon was the basic currency of Issa's time. It took the form of a coin with a hole in its middle so that it could be strung on a string. According to Shinji Ogawa, a bowl of noodles in Issa's day sold for 16 mon: the equivalent of approximately four or five U.S. dollars today, which would make one mon = 25 - 27 cents. The three mon telescope view would cost approximately 75 cents today.

Tr. and comment : David Lanoue

. Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 in Edo .

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- #meganeglasses #glassesmegane #brille #tomegane #telescope -
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2/10/2012

Chindonya Band

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Chindonya ちんどん屋 street musician
commercial street band
advertising street band


source : pegasus_es2004



PHOTO : ajinatora.exblog.jp

Street musician with Daruma at the Mihara Daruma Market
三原市のダルマ市


. Mihara Daruma 三原だるま .

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quote
Chindon'ya (チンドン屋),
also called Japanese marching band, and in the old times also called
tōzaiya (東西屋) or
hiromeya (広目屋 or 披露目屋)
are a type of elaborately costumed street musicians in Japan that advertise for shops and other establishments.
The performers advertised the opening of new stores and other venues, or promoted special events such as price discounts. Nowadays, chindon'yas are rare in Japan. The word consists of Japanese sound symbolism chin and don to describe the instruments, and the -ya suffix which roughly equates to the English "-er" suffix in this context.

Origin as single performers in Osaka

Street performers existed in Japan for a long time. However, the connection with advertising forming a chindon'ya first appeared in Osaka during the 19th century (Late Edo period and early Meiji period) at the beginning of industrialization. The first known chindon'ya is generally considered to be a candy seller in Osaka named Amekatsu, who around 1845 used singing and a noise making toy to attract attention to his own portable candy stall, as many other salespeople, especially candy sellers. Due to his strong voice he was well known in Osaka, and hence tried to sell not candy but rather advertise for other stores and a theater, wearing a large hat and straw sandals, and small bells at his belt, and used a wooden hyogoshi noisemaker. He was succeeded by a former bath attendant Isamikame, who also used to shout tozai (Literally East-West, equivalent to Listen up or welcome (come one come all)).

Subsequently, such advertising street performers were called tozaiya in Osaka up to World War II. He soon received competition from another advertiser called Matemoto, and they split their business, with one covering the Uemachi region and the other covering the Shinmachi region of Osaka.

After Maemoto died in 1891, his brother, also called Maemoto took over the business, and he was soon joined by his son and daughter, probably the first female chindon'ya. Maemoto is also famous as being the first person in Osaka to die from electric shock in 1893. Other well known performers from this time are Tanbataya Kurimaru, a former Sweet Chestnut seller, and Satsumaya Imosuke, a former bean seller. These two also occasionally added a second performer to their band.

Group performers in Tokyo
At the early Meiji period, such advertising was still unknown in Tokyo, and advertising was mainly done on curtains (noren), billboards (kanban), and flyers (hikifuda). Stalls also advertised for themselves by making noise and wearing colorful clothes, a at the time widely known example being the extremely colorful dressed pharmacist Iwashiya.



During this time, newspapers and posters also started to appear in Japan and were used for advertising. The military also started to popularize western style marching bands, and at the same time public bands started to appear. In1885 an advertising agency in Tokyo hiromeya(wide eyes) hired musicians for advertising.
Hiromeya was founded by a former tozaiya from Osaka Akita Ryukichi. He soon found out that a one person band was not as popular in Tokyo as in Osaka, and hired larger bands of more than 10 performers for advertising purposes, following the popularity of military and public bands. His band also provided entertainment at festivals and parties, and also created background music for silent films. He was also hired by the Kirin beer company, whose advertising campaign spread out to Osaka.

In Osaka, this form of group bands was yet unknown, as only individual performers were hired for advertising. The police also had to stop some of the larger performances in Osaka, as they hindered traffic, partially also caused by the 2 meter tall beer bottle the group was equipped with. The Hiromeya business grew, and they were even asked to perform at the burial of Emperor Meiji in 1912. The business still exists nowadays, although they now do mainly decorations.

MORE
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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source : shotokimura.web. Librairie Seizan


Listen to their music!
美しき天然
source : www.youtube.com



ちんどん通信社〜(有)東西屋 Their History in Japanese
source : www.tozaiya.co.jp/history




. . . CLICK here for Photos !


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Chindonya
By ALICE GORDENKER

... There are also amateur and student troupes. A good place to check out the state of the industry is the Chindonya Championship, held every April in Toyama City, Toyama Prefecture.

source : Japan Times, July 17, 2012

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Nakamura Gakuryoo 中村岳陵 Gakuryo Nakamura 中村岳陵 
(1890-1969)

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初燕今日の為なるちんどん屋
hatsu tsubame kyoo no tame naru chindonya

the first swallow -
a Chindonya band
just for today




Haiku by Hoshino Tsubaki 星野椿先生
On the occasion of the great Haiku Meeting in Komuro
信州小諸 全国俳句大会

source : chindonband


. Hoshino Tsubaki 星野 椿 .

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. gannin boozu 願人坊主 mendicant monks .
performing all kinds of performances at the roadside


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4/26/2011

Monster Hunter Airu

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Monster Hunter Airu
モンスターハンター アイルーダルマ






. . . . .


モンスターハンター アイルーダルマ貯金箱

piggy bank Airuu Daruma
Airou Daruma Piggy Bank




© PHOTO : sunny_1600

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Giri Giri Airu Mura
Giri-Giri Felyne Village

is a Japanese animation made by DLE and produced by GENEON UNIVERSAL.
Airu is the Japanese name for Felyne.

© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


Monster Hunter Toys
モンスターハンターアイルー




. photos .


Monster Hunter Airu Kutakuta Plushie Melaleu
Monster Hunter: Nikki Poka Poka Airu Mura
Monster Hunter X Touma Hunter Airu
Monster Hunter Key Chain - Airu Felyne
. Reference .


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. O-Bake Daruma and the Japanese Ghosts
お化け達磨!お化けだるま
 


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1/23/2011

Koohaku red and white

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Red and White Daruma 紅白だるま koohaku



They come in a pair in red and white,
an auspicious combination for extra good luck!

kohaku


. WKD : The color RED in Japanese culture  

. WKD : The color WHITE in Japanese culture  


Battle of Dan-no-Ura 壇ノ浦の合戦


源氏の白旗、white - 平氏の赤旗 red

The use goes back to the times of the Genpei war. 源平
In addition, this war and its aftermath established white and red , the colors of the Minamoto and Taira standards, respectively, as Japan's national colors.
Today, these colors can be seen on the flag of Japan, and also in banners and flags in sumo and other traditional activities.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genpei_War


. The Serpent Pond 蛇の池 at Heigun, Yamaguchi .
and the swords of the Genpei war.

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Click on each for more photos !







. Click for more photos !  


MORE
Photos - Red and White Daruma



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Auspicious food in red and white

. Washoku : Red and White Food  


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one of a kind Daruma cards
Each one wears a different patterened robe



Look at MORE :
source : meowkami.com


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koohaku uta gassen 紅白歌合戦
Red and White Song Battle




more commonly known as simply Kōhaku, is an annual music show on New Year's Eve produced by Japanese public broadcaster NHK and broadcast on both television and radio, nationally and internationally by NHK's networks and some overseas (mainly cable) broadcasters which bought the program. The show ends shortly before midnight.

Literally "Red and White Song Battle," the program divides the most popular music artists of the year into competing teams of red and white.
The "red" team or akagumi (赤組, 紅組) is composed of all female artists (or groups with female vocals), while
the "white" team or shirogumi (白組) is all male (or groups with male vocals).
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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. Reference : Red and White in Japan






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